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Herpes Tests – San Diego Ear, Nose & Throat – San Diego, CA

Editor’s note: Dr. In women genital warts, vaginal warts, have been associated with cervical cancer, as well as other cancers. The following health care providers offer affordable and confidential STD testing in San Diego. HSV type 1 causes cold sores (also called fever blisters) on the lips. We offer multiple testing options, ranging from individual tests to comprehensive panels. HSV-1 can also cause sores around the genitals. Syphilis is a very dangerous STDs according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and we screen for this infection using the Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) test.

We are completely confident you will receive a positive experience in our labs – they are designed to fit the way we would want to be taken care of as healthcare consumers. Our FDA-approved Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) syphilis test is the most sophisticated test for syphilis in the market. Reduce your risk of contracting an STD by getting the facts about how they are transmitted. Regular Pleasanton STD testing gives you the keys to staying in control of your sexual health. 104,236 HIV positive men were living with HIV/AIDS in 2012 in California. Native American women living in California are more likely to contract chlamydia than Native American Men. At the end of 2010, 458 out of 100,000 people in San Diego County were living with HIV.

STD testing in San Marcos, California can be done in as little as 5 minutes. Fluid from a fresh sore is added to certain cells used to grow HSV. If no virus infects the cells, the culture is negative. If the herpes virus infects the cells, the culture is positive. What are the symptoms of gonorrhea? Herpes virus antigen detection test. Cells from a fresh sore are scraped off and then smeared onto a microscope slide.

Dave had his blood and urine tested. This test may be done with or in place of a viral culture. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. A PCR test can be done on cells or fluid from a sore or on blood or on other fluid, such as spinal fluid. PCR finds the genetic material (DNA) of the HSV virus. This test can tell the difference between HSV-1 and HSV-2. Using the PCR test on skin sores isn’t common.

PCR is used mainly for testing spinal fluid in rare cases when herpes may have caused an infection in or around the brain. Antibody tests. Blood tests can find antibodies that are made by the immune system to fight a herpes infection. Antibody tests are sometimes done but are not as accurate as a viral culture at finding the cause of a specific sore or ulcer. Antibody tests cannot always tell the difference between a current active herpes infection and a herpes infection that occurred in the past. Because antibodies take time to develop after the first infection, you may not have a positive antibody test if you have just recently been infected. Some blood tests can tell the difference between HSV-1 and HSV-2.

A herpes infection cannot be cured. After you become infected with HSV, the virus stays in the body for life. It “hides” in a certain type of nerve cell and causes more outbreaks of sores in some people. Recurring infections can be triggered by stress, fatigue, sunlight, or another infection, such as a cold or flu. Medicine can relieve symptoms and shorten the length of the outbreaks, but medicine cannot cure the infection. Find out whether HSV is causing sores around the mouth or in the genital area. Find out which virus type (HSV-1 or HSV-2) is causing sores around the mouth or in the genital area.

That’s the type that usually causes genital herpes. Diagnose a herpes infection in a newborn baby whose mother has genital herpes. For a viral culture, viral antigen test, or PCR test, a clean cotton swab is rubbed against a herpes sore to collect fluid and cells for examination. Samples may be collected from the vagina, cervix, penis, urethra, eye, throat, or skin. Doctors usually collect a sample from small sores that are only a few days old. Viruses are more likely to be found in small newly formed sores. Wrap an elastic band around your upper arm to stop the flow of blood.

This makes the veins below the band larger so it is easier to put a needle into the vein. Clean the needle site with alcohol. Put the needle into the vein. More than one needle stick may be needed. Attach a tube to the needle to fill it with blood. Remove the band from your arm when enough blood is collected. Put a gauze pad or cotton ball over the needle site as the needle is removed.

Put pressure on the site and then put on a bandage. The blood sample is taken from a vein in your arm. An elastic band is wrapped around your upper arm. It may feel tight. You may feel nothing at all from the needle, or you may feel a quick sting or pinch. You may get a small bruise at the site. You can lower the chance of bruising by keeping pressure on the site for several minutes.

But once you start routinely getting the tests you need, when you need them, then it becomes, well, routine. This problem is called phlebitis. A warm compress can be used several times a day to treat this. Ongoing bleeding can be a problem for people with bleeding disorders. Aspirin, warfarin (Coumadin), and other blood-thinning medicines can make bleeding more likely. If you have bleeding or clotting problems, or if you take blood-thinning medicine, tell your doctor before your blood sample is taken. Herpes tests are done to find the herpes simplex virus (HSV).

Results for a rapid viral culture may take 2 to 3 days, while results for a standard culture can take up to 14 days. Antigen detection test results are ready in a day. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test results are ready in 1 to 3 days. Results from an antibody blood test are ready in 2 days. The results from an antibody test called an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, EIA) may be ready in about 2 hours. A normal (negative) test result does not mean you do not have a herpes infection. If the first test is negative but you have symptoms of herpes, more tests may be done.

If a culture sample is taken from a crusted, older sore. If a blood sample is taken before antibodies against HSV have formed. This period is called the window period or seroconversion period. If you are taking antiviral medicines, such as acyclovir, famciclovir, ganciclovir, or valacyclovir. What To Think About Normal test results do not mean you do not have a herpes infection. Herpes is often diagnosed by symptoms and by knowing whether the person has had contact with an infected person. Sometimes a test is not needed.

A person who has genital herpes needs to learn how to avoid spreading the disease, because the disease is more likely to be spread when he or she has sores. If you have recurrent outbreaks, especially during times of stress or illness, you can also spread the disease. You may want to know whether a herpes infection is due to HSV-1 or HSV-2 so you can take steps to prevent or treat outbreaks. A genital herpes infection can be spread from a mother to her baby during vaginal delivery. In a newborn, herpes can cause organ failure, brain infection, and death. If active herpes is present near the time of delivery, a cesarean delivery (C-section) may be done to prevent infecting the baby. Rapid tests are available at some clinics that check blood from a finger stick for antibodies to HSV-2.

The results are generally ready in about 10 minutes. These tests are more expensive than other tests and may not be available everywhere. Citations Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2010). Seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 among persons aged 14–49 years—United States, 2005–2008. MMWR, 59(15): 456–459. Also available online: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/wk/mm5915.pdf. Other Works Consulted American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (2007, reaffirmed 2009).

Management of herpes in pregnancy. ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 82. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 109(6): 1489–1498. Chernecky CC, Berger BJ (2008). Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures, 5th ed. St.

Louis: Saunders. Fischbach FT, Dunning MB III, eds. (2009). Manual of Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests, 8th ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. Pagana KD, Pagana TJ (2010). Mosby’s Manual of Diagnostic and Laboratory Tests, 4th ed.

St. Louis: Mosby.